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The early history of screen-based art, an exhibition not to be missed

Data:

20/05/2020


The early history of screen-based art, an exhibition not to be missed

We are delighted to announce the opening of the exhibition "From Screen to Mind - A 50 Year History" on 20 May 2020 at Wind H Art Center. It features, among others, six Italian avant-garde artists of world renown.

 

poster

 

From Screen to Mind – A 50 Year History
Curators: Jonas Stampe & Xiao Ge
Wind H Art Center
798 Art Zone South Gate, n. A31 Wanghongli, Beijing
20 May – 19 July 2020
Opening hours: 10-18 (everyday except Monday)

 

1952, Lucio Fontana and the Italian spatialists proclaimed il Manifesto del Movimento Spaziale per la Televisione. ”La televisione è per noi un mezzo che attendevamo come integrativo dei nostri concetti.” (Television is for us a means that we expected to be an intergrate part of our concepts)
April 15 1969, 10:15pm, Gerry Schum and his wife’s first television gallery presented its first TV exhibition.
November 28 1969, James Lee Byars used for the first time the live broadcast and interacted with the audience to create his conceptual TV work: The World Question Center.
2020, The art showing goes online worldwide.
20 May 2020, From Screen to Mind, an exhibition that investigates the early history of online screen-based art will open in a physical space.

 

At a time when going online has become a survival mode for art enterprises, ”From Screen to Mind – A 50 Year History” highlights the early history of online screen-based art, its sources and the very beginnings. 50 years ago when the internet didn’t exist, when there were no other visual online media, it was simply called television art.

01

Giovanni Anselmo, “Untitled”, 1970, 16 mm b/w film transferred to

high-definition digital media, sound, 1’11” © The artist and LIMA Foundation


From Joseph Beuys to Lawrence Weiner, this exhibition, the first of its kind in China, features 30 of the most important avant-garde artists of the time, among them Giovanni Anselmo, Alighiero Boetti, Pier Paolo Calzolari, Gino De Dominicis, Mario Merz and Gilberto Zorio from Italy. These artists were from different art movements like performance and process art, arte povera, conceptual art, photography and land art, and were the first to experiment with the medium. The exhibition will give visitors a unique opportunity to explore, understand and discuss how contemporary art can function in an online environment. By looking into its history, it will also help to raise awareness of its risks as well as its many opportunities.

02

Alighiero Boetti, ”The Body Always Speak In Silence”, 1970,16 mm b/w film transferred to

high-definition digital media, sound, 2'08" © The artist and LIMA Foundation


Although television art was first used as a notion in 1952 by Lucio Fontana and the Italian Spatialists in their Manifest for Television, it did not materialize as a specific art form until 1969 when Gerry Schum, a German artist and film maker, launched with his wife the first television gallery and broadcast its first television exhibition Land Art on April 15 1969 at 10:15 pm. It was not like any other gallery, since its physical space was the TV set in peoples’ homes. Furthermore, each of the shows were only broadcast once which gave them an extremely ephemeral character. You saw it or you missed it. That was it. There were no reruns. Schum’s visionary idea was motivated by finding a way to use the mass medium of television as an artistic medium and, consequently, make art more accessible to a wide audience. It’s an idea which also carried a critique of the commercialism of contemporary art, in line with the ideology of the emergent art movements celebrating art’s profoundly immaterial qualities.

03

Pier Paolo Calzolari, ”6th Day of Reality, 23 September 1970”, 1970, 16 mm b/w film transferred to

high-definition digital media, sound, 2'12"©The artist and LIMA Foundation


This idea, which aimed to have art works created specially for television rather than making and presenting documentaries about artists, should be put in the social and political context of Europe and the United States of the late 1960’s. Influenced by Marxist ideas of bringing art and culture to all citizens and to democratize culture, it was a time which witnessed a strong urge to make art accessible for the masses. But it was also highly influenced by new emerging and groundbreaking artistic movements of the period that aspired to go beyond the limits imposed by the traditional art disciplines of sculpture and painting.

04

Gino De Dominicis, “Attempt to fly”, 1970, 16 mm b/w film transferred to

high-definition digital media, sound, 1'56" © The artist and LIMA Foundation


If Schum’s television gallery is considered important for the emergence of video art and its early development, it also raises questions, questions which in part will be answered, hopefully, in this exhibition.

05

Mario Merz, “Untitled”, 1970, 16 mm b/w film transferred to

high-definition digital media, sound, 1'29"© The artist and LIMA Foundation


Questions were also the theme for James Lee Byars legendary conceptual work The World Question Center (November 28 1969), presented for the first time here in China. It was the first time in contemporary art history that an art work used the live broadcast as its medium and interacted with its audience. Byars attemped to gather the 100 most significant questions in the world from the 100 most brilliant minds of the time. He confronted his interlocutors - mostly artists, curators, public intellectuals, scientists, politicians - either present on set or contacted over the telephone, with a 'question-to-question' instead of a common question-to-answer situation.

06

Gilberto Zorio, “Untitled”, 1970, 16 mm b/w film transferred to

high-definition digital media, sound, 1'01"© The artist and LIMA Foundation


In celebrating the 50 plus one year anniversary of these very early innovations in screen based art, ”From Screen to Mind – A 50 Year History” wants to highlight its current position – or lack thereof - in contemporary art. Despite the fact that everybody today carries a small television screen in their pockets, also acting as a video camera, there is a lack of a screen based art. Why is that? Hopefully this exhibition will trigger further questions and give new answers.

Informazioni

Data: Da Mer 20 Mag 2020 a Dom 19 Lug 2020

Organizzato da : Wind H Art Center

Ingresso : A pagamento


Luogo:

Wind H Art Center, Beijing

1699